Softener

Questions about Making Your Own Lures

Softener

Postby mpridgen803 » Mon Jul 20, 2015 12:39 pm

When reheating soft plastic, do you need to add softener again, if you added it when its was milky color? I find myself going through a lot of softener. Thanks
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Re: Softener

Postby dahlberg » Mon Jul 20, 2015 1:39 pm

Me too! One of the main reasons to make them your self is that the factory stuff has to be tough enough so the general public doesn't squack, so tough or stiff I should say, in fact, that the fish don't seen to bite them as well as the softer more flexible versions you can make at home! Re-melt, re-pour, re-fish! However, once you've got some super soft plastic going it's usually not necessary to add much softener until several, like half a dozen, re-heatings. (unless you are re-heating far past the temp needed )
best,
L
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Re: Softener

Postby mpridgen803 » Tue Jul 21, 2015 6:08 am

Ok thanks Larry
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Re: Softener

Postby Fomen38 » Tue Jul 21, 2015 9:14 am

You can actually buy plastisol in different formulations. I bought some that is "super soft". I also have some that is made for "saltwater" (which is extra stiff). The super soft stuff is GREAT! I bought it in a gallon container for $64 (+ free shipping). I know you can add softener, and I actually own some. The reason I use the pre-softened stuff is because of consistency with the rigidity (hopefully that makes since). No matter how much I choose to use when making some plastics, I always get the same consistency with the feel of the plastics. Larry is probably a MASTER of adding hardener and softener to get the feel he's looking for, but I'm not. This takes the guess work out of it for me. If I want a stiffer plastic, I just add in some of the saltwater stuff, stir, then cure. By doing this, it makes it very easy to figure out the rigidity of your final product. Pour up a plastic with just the super soft stuff. Then pour up a plastic with the saltwater. Feel the difference between the two. Then do a 50/50 lure. If you want it softer than the 50/50, but harder than the straight super soft plastisol, do 75% super soft, and 25% saltwater. I think you probably get the point by now. You can actually make yourself a little home made chart, with the different lures affixed to it and the mix ratios underneath. By doing that, you can simply push on the lure to know which mix ratio you want to use for your plastic project. This is what I do, and it's just my $.02.

Here is the super soft stuff I bought: http://www.pouryourownworms.com/Super-S ... 8228SS.htm
Here is the saltwater stuff: http://www.pouryourownworms.com/Super-S ... 8228SS.htm

Trust me, 2 gallons of this stuff will last a LOOOOOONG TIME!

Cheers.....
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Re: Softener

Postby Mike - Alumilite » Tue Jul 21, 2015 10:21 am

I like your chart idea. I've actually done similar ratios with Softener and Alumisol ($39/gallon + shipping) to come up with recipe for different hardnesses. 50/50, 75/25, etc. Especially when making whiggleys as I've learned to actually vary the amount of flap the tail has by varying the softener load. I can make a crazy wide flap to the tail compared to a tighter tail action an actual shad would have by varying the softener amount approx. 10%. Its really cool to be able to dial in lures that specifically all with a home made recipe card.
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Re: Softener

Postby mpridgen803 » Wed Jul 22, 2015 5:50 am

Yea , the baits i pour never come out the same , when it comes to softness.I will definitely try that. Thanks
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Re: Softener

Postby Mike - Alumilite » Wed Jul 22, 2015 12:20 pm

Another thing that can vary the hardness of your lures is IF you have any settling of the vinyl in the plastisol or Alumisol you use. The higher the vinyl content of your soft plastic, the stiffer or more firm the hardness. If you only pour lures periodically as I do when I have time or am making videos, the vinyl can and will settle to the bottom of your container. If it does not get completely mixed back in the lure will be softer! If it has sat a long time, you might need to take a stir stick or something to the bottom to scrape it off the bottom, then one up, mix thoroughly until the build up or settling has dispersed back evenly. If you have ever see white sediment in the bottom of your container after emptying, that is what it is.

Just another factor to keep in mind when dialing in hardness of your soft plastic.

Mike
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